The Beatles release their 10th on January 13, 1969. It’s the soundtrack to the animated film of the same name.

 

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Introducing … The Beatles 

Released on January 10, 1964 on Vee-Jay records, it’s the debut album … depending upon who you talk to. It comes out 10 days before Capitol Records’ Meet The Beatles which actually beat Introducing to the charts by one week. It’s all so confusing and who the hell cares. Everything changed in 1964.

Source: Introducing … The Beatles – You Can’t Make This Stuff Up …

10 Great Beatles Moments We Owe to George Martin  

Sir George Martin ~ b. January 3, 1926.

This is as good a take as anyone but I do think Jordan missed out by not including “I Am The Walrus” and “Eleanor Rigby.”

The things he and Paul did with McCartney’s bass were genius.Revisit 10 Beatles moments that would have been impossible without late producer and “fifth Beatle” George Martin.

Source: 10 Great Beatles Moments We Owe to George Martin  

When Eddie Murphy Was the Fifth Beatle

“Yeah, man, I was ripped off by the whole group, and the whole group got a behind kicking coming to them when I see ’em. I been lookin’ for them boys since 1962, and that’s why they got that around-the-clock security in their house, ’cause they know that when Clarence Walker find ‘em, he gonna take a chunk out of their behind.”

Source: When Eddie Murphy Was the Fifth Beatle

The Circus 

December 11, 1968 ~ The Rolling Stones record their Rolling Stones’ Rock and Roll Circus TV special – and then bury it for nearly 30 years.

The Boys organize and headline the event, which is played under a grungy circus tent for invited guests, most of whom wear yellow ponchos. Among the acts preceding the Stones’ performance are Jethro Tull, The Who, Taj Mahal, and assorted — well — circus acts. Also appearing: The Dirty Mac, a one-time grouping of Eric Clapton, John Lennon, Keith Richards, and Mitch Mitchell.

The recording takes far longer than expected, lasting until 5 o’clock the next morning. The special never airs: rumor has it that Jagger is so disappointed with the Stones’ showing that he kills it. This decision holds until October 12, 1996, when it is finally shown at the New York Film Festival and is released on video.