Orpheus and Newport Folk Festival

37 years after pulling out an electric guitar and hearing boos from the tight-ass folkies in the Newport Folk Festival crowd, Orpheus returns to Newport Folk Festival for the first time on August 3, 2002 and plays 2-plus hours in a fake beard and wig.

Orpheus opens with Subterranean Homesick Blues — the opening song on his first-ever electric album. Dig it.

Music Review: Bob Dylan’s ‘Murder Most Foul’ 

The Sixties pop prophet describes a revolution in reverse.

Source: Music Review: Bob Dylan’s ‘Murder Most Foul’ | National Review

 

Not even Dylan can challenge a culture that refuses to listen, and “Murder Most Foul,” at 17 minutes long, became part of the ceaseless noise that only streaming subscribers have the privilege to admire or ignore. It should have been an event. Instead, its complacent reception shows that our popular culture has simply become indifferent. This new song, a summary of everything Dylan knows, bears witness to cultural revolution that is in fact a revolution in reverse.

Armond White, National Review

The greatest rock ‘n roll song of all time turns 55 …

July 20, 1965 ~ Orpheus releases “Like A Rolling Stone.”

Dylan struggled with the song. Al Kooper, his keyboard player, suggested a “rock” format and promptly improvised the famous organ riff.

Over the years, it became clear the song was revolutionary in more than its lyrics. It’s considered one of the most influential compositions in rock. It’s #1 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. 

Perhaps the greatest homage comes from The Boss:

“Like a Rolling Stone” feels like a torrent that comes rushing towards you … floods your soul, floods your mind. Alerts and wakes you up instantaneously to other worlds, other lives. Other ways of being. It’s perhaps one of the most powerful records ever made and it still means a great deal to me along with all of Dylan’s work.”

Bruce Springsteen

June 16, 1965 ~ The Greatest Rock ‘n Roll Song Ever is born 

55 years ago, Dylan struggled with the song. Al Kooper, his keyboard player, suggested a “rock” format and promptly improvised the famous organ riff.

Over the years, it became clear the song was revolutionary in more than its lyrics. It’s considered one of the most influential compositions in rock. It’s #1 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. And, in 2014, the handwritten lyrics from the pencil of Dylan fetched over $2M at auction.