Another Auction Ends a Family Farm

Want to know why so many dairy farms in Wisco and nationally are going out of business?

… in 2017, the U.S. Department of Agriculture came under control of the Trump Administration and new Secretary Sonny Perdue, with promises to remove regulations to give organic farming a niche in the marketplace. The administration relaxed federal regulations regarding required grazing for organic operations, allowing farms much larger than Adams to become certified organic. That development would prove pivotal in eventually forcing Adams and other organic dairy operations to struggle and, in some cases, shut down.   As more factory farms got into the organic industry, the amount of milk increased significantly, driving down price. The milk Adams had been selling at $38 per hundredweight (100 pounds of milk), dropped to $29, a loss of about $3,600 per day. He needed a price of $32 to break even, even after the bank relaxed some terms of his loan …

Source: Another Auction Ends a Family Farm

Trump supporters — including many in my family — can’t figure out why I don’t support him. Aside from the obvious reasons, it’s ignorant and poorly thought out decisions like the above.

Advertisements

Digging into the Farm Debate: Reviving New Deal Supply Management for the 21st Century

It seems that is what Senators Warren and Sanders are preparing for—a national debate about how the federal government can and should directly manage agricultural markets to ensure that big agribusiness pays a fair price, one that builds economic security for farmers.

Source: Digging into the Farm Debate: Reviving New Deal Supply Management for the 21st Century | IATP

U.S. agriculture secretary: No guarantee small farms will survive 

Thank you for all your help, Sonny … you horse’s ass.

President Donald Trump’s agriculture secretary said Tuesday during a stop in Wisconsin that he doesn’t know if the family dairy farm can survive as the industry moves toward a factory farm model.

Source: U.S. agriculture secretary: No guarantee small farms will survive – StarTribune.com