Nevermind 

Released on September 24, 1991 …

Wisco and the MadCity have a soft spot in their collective hearts for “Nevermind.”  The album was produced by Butch Vig and the band traveled out to Vig’s Smart Studios in Madison, Wisconsin, recording from April 2 to 6, 1990.

On April 6, the band played a local show in Madison with fellow Seattle band Tad. Vig began to mix the recordings while the band hung out in Madison, giving an interview to Madison’s community radio station WORT on April 7.

Nevermind was released on September 24, 1991 and was responsible in part for bringing both alternative rock and grunge music to a mainstream audience.  It’s #17 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time and in 2005, the Library of Congress added it to the National Recording Registry, which collects “culturally, historically or aesthetically important” sound recordings from the 20th century.

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Silversun Pickups announce new album, Widow’s Weeds, share “It Doesn’t Matter Why”: Stream

Silversun Pickups have announced their first album in four years, Widow’s Weeds . Serving as the follow-up to 2014’s Better Nature , the 10-track effort is out June 7th via the band’s own New Machine Recordings. Marking the Pickups’ fifth full-length overall, Widow’s Weeds was recorded with the help of producer Butch Vig .

Source: Silversun Pickups announce new album, Widow’s Weeds, share “It Doesn’t Matter Why”: Stream

Nevermind

Nevermind

Wisco and the MadCity have a soft spot in their collective hearts for Nevermind.  The album was produced by Butch Vig and the band traveled out to Vig’s Smart Studios in Madison, Wisconsin, recording from April 2 to 6, 1990. On April 6, the band played a local show in Madison with fellow Seattle band Tad. Vig began to mix the recordings while the band hung out in Madison, giving an interview to Madison’s community radio station WORT on April 7.

Nevermind was released on September 24, 1991 and was responsible in part for bringing both alternative rock and grunge music to a mainstream audience.  It’s #17 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time and in 2005, the Library of Congress added it to the National Recording Registry, which collects “culturally, historically or aesthetically important” sound recordings from the 20th century.