Grateful Dead Perform Final ‘I Will Take You Home’ On This Date In 1990

The Grateful Dead took the stage at Foxboro Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts on this date in 1990, where they would play the final live version of the John Barlow/Brent Mydland penned “I Will Take You Home.” Mydland died a few weeks later on July 26.

Source: Grateful Dead Perform Final ‘I Will Take You Home’ On This Date In 1990

Karla Bonoff Looks Back While Moving Forward

“It’s really hard right now not knowing when we’ll be able to do that again. You know, we’re always bitching about the planes, the hotels. But, in reality, I just love performing for the fans who’ve been seeing us for 40-years. That’s what I miss most. Seeing our fans.”

Source: Karla Bonoff Looks Back While Moving Forward

Exile in Guyville

It’s rare that a debut album is a masterpiece. Liz Phair releases her “Exile” on June 22, 1993. It’s considered one of the best albums of the 90’s — a track-by-track response to the Rolling Stones’ Exile on Main Street. It’s #327 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. (It’s #4 on mine if anyone cares …)

Liz says she was attacted to Mick’s persona and the album because ” … it perfectly fit my impression of what was going on in the head of this guy I had a crush on. I could project onto the Stones and they would answer back. It was like having a relationship through the music.”

Ex-Defense Secretary William Perry joins Mattis in condemning Trump 

Mattis wrote that Trump was dividing the nation and was threatening the Constitution. He argued that the current military leadership erred in accompanying Trump to the church, and that there was no reason to adopt a militarized response to the unrest sweeping the country following the death of George Floyd in police custody.

Source: Ex-Defense Secretary William Perry joins Mattis in condemning Trump – POLITICO

The Master of Smoothness

He’d seen it all. Rest in peace, sir.

R.I.P. Jimmy Capps, “The Gambler” Guitarist and Grand Ole Opry Member Dies at 81

Capps was part of The Nashville A-Team, a collective of session musicians who backed artists like Elvis, Patsy Cline, Bob Dylan, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Brenda Lee throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s. In Capps’ case, he famously played on Kenny Rogers’ “The Gambler”, George Jones’ “He Stopped Loving Her Today”, and George Strait’s “Amarillo by Morning”. He also shared time in the studio with Johnny Cash, Reba McEntire, Ray Charles, Andy Williams, and Alan Jackson.

Source: R.I.P. Jimmy Capps, “The Gambler” Guitarist and Grand Ole Opry Member Dies at 81 | Consequence of Sound

American Recordings 

The 81st (that number is just stupid) album from Johnny Cash is released on April 26, 1994.

It’s the beginning of a resurgence for The Man In Black. The album is produced by the legendary Rick Rubin and is recorded in Rubin’s living room, Johnny’s cabin, and in LA’s Viper Room. The result was an Americana masterpiece.

It won a Grammy and is #366 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.